Sunday, December 14, 2008

Summary Analysis of the poem, “Trees” by Alfred Joyce Kilmer

LIFE of Alfred Joyce Kilmer
American poet
(1886-1918)

Born: New Brunswick, New Jersey
Educated at: Rutgers College and Columbia University
Milestones: From 1909 to 1917 he was on the staff of the New
Standard Dictionary, as well as various periodicals.

He was killed in France during World War I

His lyric poem “Trees,” in the collection Trees and Other
Poems (1914), won him popular recognition.

His other works are Summer of Love (1911) and Main
Street and Other Poems (1915).

Summary Analysis:

Trees
Alfred Joyce Kilmer

I think I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree
A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast.
A tree that looks at God all day
And lifts her leafy arms to pray.
A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Under whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives in rain.
Poems are made by fools like me
But only God can make a tree.

I think I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.

Alfred Joyce Kilmer wrote this poem when he was fascinated with the trees as he opened his window one day that morning. He came up with the idea writing this poem personifying a person’s trait or actions to inanimate object, a tree, where he found it as a lovely idea.


A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breasts.

A tree gets its water for nourishment on the ground for survival. “A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed” represents the roots clinging on to the ground while it drinks the “earth’s sweet flowing” which represents water that nourishes the life of the tree. In connection with this, just like us, humans, we get our sustenance from the earth’s abundance and resources. These give us the strength of life for it nourishes plants and other beings. As such, it is also referred to as the Mother Earth.


A tree looks at God all day
And lifts her leafy arms to pray.

A tree grows upward and thus seem to be reaching to God. People from all walks of life though of different races, cultures, colors or beliefs, are reaching to God, praising, worshipping, praying and thanking Him for the bountiful blessings He gave to us.


A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair.

The trees’ thick foliage serves as shade and shelter for birds and other creatures. During summer time, birds rest on the “trees’ hair” which symbolizes the trees’ branches.


Under whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.

During winter, snow falls thus covering the trees especially its trunk. Being sturdy, trees withstand the cold. When the rain comes, trees grow better and healthier. Their leaves are not only becoming greener but also shinier. The tree “intimately lives with rain” because rain nourishes it and makes it luxuriant.



Poems are made by fools like me
But only God can make a tree.

A person can never make a tree because he/she is not God. Only God has the power to create a perfect natural form like a tree. “Fools” was the term used by the Alfred Joyce Kilmer to describe poets just like him, who loves to write poems as lovely as a tree. In as much that, it comes from a person’s product of his creations and imaginations.


Contributed by: Arleen

Thursday, December 4, 2008

Summary Analysis of the poem, “Simplicity” by Emily Dickinson

LIFE of Emily Dickinson
American poet

Birth: December 10, 1830
Death: May 15, 1886
Place of Birth: Amherst, Massachusetts
Known for: Exploring personal themes of love, death, and
religion in short, lyrical poems


Character:


Living in a life of seclusion, simplicity, aloof, independently-minded, quick-witted, often ill at ease in other people’s company, shyness in social situations but can mingle with the people that are closed to her.


Milestones:


1840s Attended Amherst Academy and Mount
Holyoke Female Seminary (now Mount Holyoke
College)

1850s Began writing poetry voluminously, organizing her work into small booklets

1862 Sent four poems to American writer Thomas Wentworth Higginson for his opinion; he advised her not to publish them

1886 After Dickinson's death, her sister Lavinia discovered her poems and gave them to Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Mabel Loomis Todd for publication.

1890 Editors Higginson and Todd published about 115 of Dickinson's poems in Poems of Emily Dickinson.

1955 The first complete collection of Dickinson's poems appeared in The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson.

Monday, December 1, 2008

Being Me

Written by: Arleen
Date Written: September 22, 2008; 8:33 in the morning

How greatful is the waterbearer
That flows in the eyes of many
And doesn’t care about being alone
And being single never fears
Whose water of cooling blue
A flowing abundance go through
And independent as the sun
Associates or shines alone
Fulfilling ultimate purpose
Of simple happiness
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